r/WhitePeopleTwitter 28d ago

Man reports missing father to police. Police interrogates him for 17 hours, withholds medication, lied about his father being found dead, and threatened to kill his dog if he didn't confess to killing his father. He confessed and tried to hang himself. Turns out his father was alive and well.

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u/WhatYouThinkYouSee 28d ago

Article link

Perez had told police that his father, 71-year-old Thomas Perez Sr., went out for a walk with the family dog at about 10 p.m. on Aug. 7, 2018. The dog returned within minutes without Perez’s father. Investigators didn’t believe his story, and over the next 17 hours they grilled him to try to get to the “truth.”

Later, during their interview, the detectives told Perez his father’s body actually had been found already.

According to court records, detectives told Perez that his father was dead, that they had recovered his body and it now “wore a toe tag at the morgue.” They said they had evidence that Perez killed his father and that he should just admit it, records show.

Perez insisted he didn’t remember killing anyone, but detectives allegedly told him that the human mind often tries to suppress troubling memories.

At one point during the interrogation, the investigators even threatened to have his pet Labrador Retriever, Margosha, euthanized as a stray, and brought the dog into the room so he could say goodbye. “OK? Your dog’s now gone, forget about it,” said an investigator.

“How can you sit there, how can you sit there and say you don’t know what happened, and your dog is sitting there looking at you, knowing that you killed your dad?” a detective said. “Look at your dog. She knows, because she was walking through all the blood.”

“When can you take us to show us where Daddy is?” asked one of the investigators.

Perez became so distraught that he began pulling out his hair, hitting himself, making anguished noises and tearing off his shirt while police encouraged him to confess, according to a summary of the case written by U.S. District Court Judge Dolly Gee.

Finally, after curling up with the dog on the floor, Perez broke down and confessed. He said he had stabbed his father multiple times with a pair of scissors during an altercation in which his father hit Perez over the head with a beer bottle. He was so distraught that he even tried to hang himself with the drawstring from his shorts after being left alone in the interrogation room. Perez was arrested, handcuffed and transported to a mental hospital for 72-hour observation.

Perez’s father wasn’t dead — or even missing. Thomas Sr. was at Los Angeles International Airport waiting for a flight to see his daughter in Northern California. But police didn’t immediately tell Perez.

“Mentally torturing a false confession out of Tom Perez, concealing from him that his father was alive and well, and confining him in the psych ward because they made him suicidal, in my 40 years of suing the police I have never seen that level of deliberate cruelty by the police,” said Jerry Steering, Perez’s attorney in Newport Beach.

Perez’s lawsuit claims detectives also refused for several hours to retrieve his medication for high blood pressure, asthma, depression and stress.

Police picked up the father at the airport and brought him to the Fontana station.

But the investigation didn’t stop there. Detectives obtained a warrant to again search Perez’s house for evidence that he had assaulted an “unknown victim,” according to Gee’s summary.

It appears none was found.

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u/Aurorious 28d ago

Just to get this straight.

They told him “the mind can make up memories, just cause you don’t remember killing him doesn’t mean you didn’t”

He confesses

They then proceed to search his house saying “well he confessed, if his dads fine he must have killed someone”

Wtf kinda logic is that lol

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u/Debs_4_Pres 28d ago

Police Logic™

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u/NUTS_STUCK_TO_LEG 28d ago

Literally some of the dumbest motherfuckers alive and we’ve decided that the best thing to pair with their complete lack of intelligence and critical thinking is a badge and gun so they can mag dump into any acorn anyone who makes them a little scared

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u/Sulissthea 28d ago

it's been shown that they literally won't hire intelligent people

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u/GertyFarish11 28d ago

Intelligent people are less likely to blindly follow orders.

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u/Far_Bite9857 28d ago

Badge and a gun? You think that's the scary part? Rofl. How about that almost limitless immunity to the Laws they supposedly uphold?

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u/LukesRightHandMan 28d ago

That immunity would be less scary if they were armed with clipboards and we were taught since childhood to ignore them.

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u/worldspawn00 28d ago edited 28d ago

Because a conviction is more important than actually catching the criminal, apparently...

The community is no safer, but it looks good on their record, and that's all that matters.

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u/Debs_4_Pres 28d ago

Honestly I'd be shocked if the conviction even mattered, since that's on a prosecutor. "Number of arrests made" is probably the thing that gets them a promotion 

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u/MickeyRooneysPills 28d ago

Police are given performance evaluations through proprietary software algorithms sold to cities by private companies like Vector or PowerDMS. It's a mixture of calls responded to, cases cleared, complaints, and other factors.

That's why the "there are no quotas" line is bullshit. Just because there is not an official policy that says "each officer must write 20 tickets per week" doesn't mean they aren't counting and doesn't mean it isn't a factor.

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u/sadicarnot 28d ago

Which is exactly the opposite of Peelian principles

To recognize always that the test of police efficiency is the absence of crime and disorder, and not the visible evidence of police action in dealing with them.

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u/SacredAnalBeads 28d ago

That's exactly how it works, plus bragging rights to other cops about this wild case they "cracked".

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u/djublonskopf 28d ago

The logic is "we need to find drugs in this guys house, or anything else that we can use to paint him in the media as a criminal lowlife that nobody should care about."

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u/whatdoblindpeoplesee 28d ago

We found half a gram of weed, get him!

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u/notbobby125 28d ago

Holds up a bag of lettuce.

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u/sparkymcgeezer 28d ago

Hey, in Texas he probably could have been tried, convicted, and executed for killing his (still alive) dad, because "well, he confessed, right?"

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u/WaldoDeefendorf 28d ago

Not just Texas. How many cases with guys on death does it come out witnesses lied. Material evidence completely exonerates a guy and even confession by another who clearly did yet the DA's and other responsible still say, "yeah we aren't letting him go."

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u/Detective-Crashmore- 28d ago

They've literally been quoted saying "evidence of innocence isn't enough" to keep him off death row.

Essentially: "listen motherfuckers, we've decided we're killing this guy regardless, and there's nothing anybody can do about it."

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u/Third_Sundering26 28d ago edited 28d ago

America is fucked. The quote “Innocence proves nothing” from Warhammer 40k is supposed to be a satirical show of how terrible the setting is. Not a guide for how our criminal justice system should work.

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u/yellowseptember 28d ago

This is why law enforcement should require a degree. Honestly, I find it amazing you can be a cop after just six months.

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u/frustratedNstressed 28d ago

It takes lawyers 10 years to interpret the law but a cop only 6 months to enforce it. Fucking bullshit.

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u/DogmanDOTjpg 28d ago

The same logic they used to coach children into making up stories of satanic ritual abuse to put innocent people in prison for life

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u/TinyFugue 28d ago

Wtf kinda logic is that lol

That's "Oh shit, we're about to be in some serious trouble unless we add many layers of bullshit to protect ourselves" logic.

That's the level of mental gymnastics that makes a U.S.A. Team doctor want to stick his thumb up your ass.

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u/DistantKarma 28d ago edited 28d ago

A similar thing happened here in Jacksonville, Florida. A woman was murdered one morning leaving her hotel room. Police just happened to see this 15 year old black kid walking nearby and even though what he wearing was nothing even close to what had been described by witnesses they detained him, took him in to interview him and used a lot of the same tactics on him. He was at the police station so long, his parents actually came to the same station to report him missing, but of course they were never notified. At one point, after getting the false confession they drove him to where the gun was supposed to be and one officer took him off, very far away from the road and the other officers so he could beat him up because he wasn't being truthful enough. It became painfully obvious that this wasn't the guy, but the police still wouldn't back down or admit any errors. The kid's lawyers were amazing though and showed the cruelty at every step. Even asking the one officer why he led the kid 500 feet away from the road when he stated the gun was thrown from a car during his false confession. There was an Oscar winning documentary about it actually, "Murder On A Sunday Morning." I should add... When the jury came back with their not guilty verdict they actually added in their statement that the Jacksonville Sheriff's office needs to be investigated over this whole incident. Of course, nothing happened.

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u/TinyFugue 28d ago

It became painfully obvious that this wasn't the guy

Why back down when, with a little effort, he "could be the guy," you know?

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u/Difficult_Bit_1339 28d ago

Yeah, fuck it, I'm not doing extra paperwork. Let the DA sort it out.

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u/LuinAelin 28d ago

This just sounds like the police want somebody (and they hope that guy is black) to be convicted for a crime no matter the guilt

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u/iampermabanned 28d ago

I really do mean this..

FUCK THE POLICE

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u/lballantyne 28d ago

Also, fuck, whatever judge give them that warrant

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u/bitofadikdik 28d ago

Different sides of the sams shitty coin.

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u/acog 28d ago

The judge may not be at fault. They have to go off whatever “facts” the police report. The police probably falsified the basis for a warrant.

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u/GingeritisMaximus 28d ago

Look, I’m not advocating for violence, but the police does this shit because they run no risk of being held accountable. Make sure these kinds of behaviours by people in power get them the death penalty, maybe then the amount of raging psychopaths that end up being a cop decreases.

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u/SmithersLoanInc 28d ago

We really need to charge them as if they aren't cops. I want murder charges, kidnapping charges, rape charges applied to them the way they are to all of us.

There's zero reason those cops shouldn't spend the next couple decades behind bars.

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u/analfissuregenocide 28d ago

We should charge them as if they are cops, but not the way they normally are. They are supposed to uphold the law, so should be held to a higher standard when they break it and charges and penalties should be GREATER for these pigs. ACAB

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u/Pneumatrap 28d ago

At the very least, being involved in law enforcement and found guilty of a crime should automatically guarantee the maximum punishment by law.

Now actually having police taken to court for shit, let alone found guilty... that's a whole issue unto itself that I don't have any suggestions for solving beyond a blanket "get the boots out of your mouth".

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u/sobrique 28d ago

Agreed. If you hold a position of 'public trust' then violating that trust is an additional betrayal, and it is - or should be - a big deal.

Even if they don't strictly speaking break the law in the process - abuse of granted authority probably should be a crime.

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u/Cyanide_Cheesecake 28d ago

Will never happen until we get more fuckin conservatives out of government.

And if we launch some of those SCOTUS justices to Venus or something.

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u/WombatBum85 28d ago

I think assholes typically belong in Uranus

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u/ssbm_rando 28d ago

We really need to charge them as if they aren't cops.

We really need to charge them much harsher than normal people.

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u/prosocial_introvert 28d ago

I want them dead. A group of people like this shouldn't be able to walk the earth any longer. Ban me idgaf

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u/PinAccomplished927 28d ago

I want their faces, names, and addresses on the news, but either one works 🤷‍♂️

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u/Sciencetor2 28d ago

I support the death penalty for some of these cases, because being a police officer offers too much of a safety net to get you out of trouble otherwise.

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u/Sero19283 28d ago

Doxx them and let the people these public servants "serve and protect" elect a suitable punishment.

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u/trebory6 28d ago

I've been saying this for years but Reddit keeps acting like White knights.

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u/Rhakha 28d ago

This is why we need to ban qualified immunity. They have been getting away with shit like this for too long. If we can’t hold them accountable, we do not live in a free country (not that I thought we did due to recent events by right wing politicians and state governments)

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u/TestOk8411 28d ago

Well if you want this don't vote for trump or any republican. Ever

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u/Rhakha 28d ago

I used to be republican. I was raised that way but thank god I saw the writing on the wall during 2016. I just regret voting for Gary Johnson, instead of Hillary.

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u/jrh_101 28d ago

I wouldn't be surprised if cops get higher bonuses for more jailed people as good performance or bonuses from the privatized jail industry

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u/ZeiglerJaguar 28d ago

Oh, they do. Or at least, their supervisors want splashy arrest-number statistics that they can report to show what a good job they are doing fighting crime, which Joe and Jane Voter unquestioningly devour every single time.

This very thing was what Adrian Schoolcraft uncovered, and it sure as shit hasn't stopped in the years since, and it won't until the ever-credulous public stops taking cops' word as gospel.

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u/xMilk112x 28d ago

And none of these detectives will ever be disciplined. Just another day at the office.

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u/newsflashjackass 28d ago

You are absolutely correct but you obscure the lesson:

DO NOT TALK TO POLICE

The founding fathers bled and fought so you would not have to talk to police. It is your constitutional right not to talk to police.

Real Americans do not talk to police.

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u/meownfloof 28d ago edited 28d ago

My friend’s dad is an attorney. He’s let us all know that you do not talk to police without representation. Doesn’t matter what you did (or didn’t do) or what they’re asking. Without a witness they do all sorts of heinous shit.

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u/swimming_singularity 28d ago

I was told to ask for a lawyer, then be quiet. Refuse to answer, but clearly state you will not talk without a lawyer present. Say nothing besides that.

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u/meownfloof 28d ago

Exactly this. One word. Lawyer. “Where were you…” “Lawyer”.

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u/ragglefragglesnaggle 28d ago edited 28d ago

NWA had a point. FUCK THE POLICE!

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u/ketamine-wizard 28d ago

Louder please

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u/seriouslyoveritnow 28d ago

Super fuck them.

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u/dudemanguylimited 28d ago

I don't know how often this needs to be repeated until people understand it: The US is a police state. And people want it this way. Otherwise the greatest democracy of the world would change it. Right?

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u/curious_dead 28d ago

And then all the cops amd detectives involved were arrested and sent to jail in general pop, right? RIGHT?

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u/Valoneria 28d ago

wdym, the public got to pay the victim a handsome (lol) sum of money for the minor issue of having him mentally tortured and falsely hounded by the police, the police had no wrongdoing in this, and you're a leftist commie if you think otherwise.

/s

But really, that's not a rotten apple, that's the whole tree that needs removing.

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u/jaysrule24 28d ago

Burn the entire fucking orchard to the ground

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u/Loko8765 28d ago edited 28d ago

It’s a rotten apple, or it started that way. The meaning of the saying is that a single rotten apple will cause the whole barrel to rot, and in the current situation so much of the barrel is rotten that in effect all of it is. I am sure that any cop who wants to be a good upstanding cop will be ruthlessly pushed out because he is a risk for all the rotten ones.

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u/Jansanmora 28d ago edited 28d ago

Per the article, three of the four are still actively employed with the department with no discipline whatsoever. The fourth retired for unrelated reasons, also with no discipline whatsoever.

In other words, the department is essentially admitting that the officers behaved exactly how they always do and are expected to, and are continuing to routinely torture people into false confessions without even pretending that this was an aberration. Why would you try to discipline or even pretend to retrain when this is what they want and expect their officers to do?

That's the only possible message to take from this.

ACAB

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u/weed_blazepot 28d ago

What the fuck were they even trying to prove or get out of this? "Haha, we got the confession we know is false. Now go get his dad and show him he's fine... and..." And ... what?? What the actual fuck was the plan?

Torture a man to get a warrant to maybe find unrelated things in their house that likely wouldn't be admissible in court because they were unrelated to the case/warrant, which again, was obtained by torturing someone who went to the cops for help?

These people should be named, shamed, fined, and denied jobs in any public facing or security-related capacity.

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u/djublonskopf 28d ago

If they can find any drugs in the guy's house, or evidence of any other crime, they can get the media to run "this guy was a criminal" as the story, and that is usually enough to convince people not to care about anything else that happened to them.

"Cops tortured a confession out of an innocent man" sounds kinda bad. "Cops used their strength and smarts to get a confession out of a lowlife criminal" gets a standing ovation from the "tough on crime" crowd.

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u/weed_blazepot 28d ago edited 28d ago

But why was that their go to response to "My elderly father is missing." Why turn that into "Let's torture this person and psychologically break them on the off chance they might have some weed in their house." Like, they know goddamn well about a dozen drug dens they could bust, but they don't because the slow trickle of arrests maintains their budgets and arrest numbers, so why try to turn someone who had a legitimate need for the police into a criminal "just in case" it worked out? Why not just help the guy? Or say, "Your dad is at the airport. He'll call in 4 hours."

Like it honestly feels like huge parts of the story are missing... but I bet they aren't. These cops are just horrible. Saw a "foreign sounding last name" and went into hate mode. It's just a level of sociopathic psychopathy I cannot comprehend. And that others were like "This seems like a reasonable response" is even worse.

And then it costs taxpayers a million dollars to cover their actions? Fuck that.

Police should be required to handle these fines out of their pension fund, or carry private insurance for payouts. Lose your policy or run your own well dry, lose your job. Period.

I have no problem with my tax dollars go to public service, but we should not be bolstering their "bad behavior fund."

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u/smell_my_pee 28d ago

The cruelty is what they got out of this. The plan was to be cruel because it brings them joy. They succeeded.

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u/Melodic_Mulberry 28d ago

It's fascinating and horrifying how quickly concentrated mental torture can alter a person's cognition, leading them to believe they killed someone. Even more horrifying is that there are people willing to inflict that torture on others.

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u/CIMARUTA 28d ago

Yeah that is mind blowing

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u/Banch 28d ago

"There are only four lights"

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u/FrostByte_62 28d ago

We've known for a very very very long time that torture is not a reliable interrogation technique. It simply doesn't work. Countless documents and studies from intelligence agencies all over the world show it doesn't work. The CIA knows for a fact it doesn't work. It is slow and unreliable due to being riddled with false positives.

The only reason torture is used is because the torturers enjoy it.

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u/SuperSimpleSam 28d ago

Friend had this happen to him. He closed a store for the night and it was robbed after hours. The police had him come in for questioning and after 4 hours, he was almost convinced that he had in fact robbed it. He said it was really eye opening of when police say they got a confession.

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u/kingtibius 28d ago

I would like to thank the phrase “In my 40 years of suing the police” for giving me a quick chuckle after tearing up at the rest of this horror story

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u/SNESamus 28d ago

Yeah, based af lawyer

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u/DennenTH 28d ago

They're getting worse.  Which imo should have been a difficult accomplishment, but they somehow succeeded.

This is why I don't "respect the blue".  Respect is earned and most of the time, this is the side that is facing the public.

Police want more respect?  Earn it.  Try putting your best foot forward.  Try leading by example.  Try using restraint.  Try not being criminals.  Those people that did this don't deserve a paid vacation.  They don't deserve their pensions.  They deserve a jail cell because we all know a common citizen wouldn't get away with that shit.

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u/Callaloo_Soup 28d ago

I wouldn’t say they‘re getting worse. This stuff has been happening.

They’re being outed.

Victims are being believed.

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u/OmicronAlpharius 28d ago

Yeah, this is nothing new. Unarmed, non threatening citizens being gunned down in the streets is nothing new. People just have cell phone cameras now.

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u/newsflashjackass 28d ago

They're getting worse. Which imo should have been a difficult accomplishment, but they somehow succeeded.

By sheer coincidence, cops seem to be getting worse in direct proportion to the amount of body camera footage they are required to provide and the amount of resultant scrutiny to which they are subjected.

I'm sure we all expected the body cams to validate the official police narrative. What a surprise.

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u/CatButler 28d ago

I feel like I'd rather be in a room with convicts than cops. At least the convicts would go to jail if they killed me.

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u/Vark675 28d ago

Most convicts have a goal behind their violence. Cops just get bored.

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u/Commercial_Yak7468 28d ago

"They're getting worse"

I think people need to realize this is by design and it is prep work. There is a reason the GOP has worked so hard to court and groom police over the past few decades. 

They have pushed polices to encourage this behavior because if they win 2024, it will be alot easier to get police to implement their planned purges.

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u/HerpankerTheHardman 28d ago

In the last few decades theyve been given military grade equipment as well, turning them into a small local army. It's just too much power.

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u/Tentacled-Tadpole 28d ago

Honestly, those scum need ending. They are a massive danger to society. Literally kidnapping and torturing someone and all they will get is a slap on the wrist. They seriously deserve life in prison.

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u/Debs_4_Pres 28d ago

Worth repeating: NEVER speak to the police without an attorney present. Whether you've been formally charged or not. They are not your friends. 

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u/FerociousVader 28d ago

Is it just me or does $900K not seem like enough here?

$900K + 15 years in prison for the cops sounds better.

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u/kawika69 28d ago

Maybe if the 900k came directly from the offenders own pockets.

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u/analfizzzure 28d ago

This is the answer. In financial services you are held liable for intentional damages. No reason it shouldn't apply to cops.

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u/Adventurous_Ad6698 28d ago

If they make it come out of the cops' pension fund, this shit will stop because EVERY cop will know who is fucking up their retirement and make their lives a living hell.

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u/Jimmyjo1958 28d ago

This is the way. That and making cops carry personal liability insurance

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u/AfricanusEmeritus 28d ago

It sure works wonders in the medical, mental health, and legal fields. Personal liability insurance is the way.

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u/JaleyHoelOsment 28d ago

OH YEAH? then who would you call when your father goes missing… oh… wait

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u/spiphy 28d ago

oh, but there is a reason. The supreme court didn't like the law so they made up their own. Now we have qualified immunity.

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u/SirGlass 28d ago

IANAL but my limited understanding is even the argument that was used make zero sense

The argument was ""[a] policeman's lot is not so unhappy that he must choose between being charged with dereliction of duty if he does not arrest when he had probable cause, and being mulcted in damages if he does.""

However how does this square with "warren vs DC" where the court also ruled that police have no actual obligation to anyone to do anything. Officers cannot get in trouble if they don't arrest someone they are under no obligation to arrest anyone?

meaning an officer can't get charged with "dereliction of duty" in the first place because Warren vs DC basically said police have no obligation to do anything!

Meaning the entire argument for qualified immunity was saying ; hey sometimes officers are in a tough spot and if they arrest the suspect maybe they get sued for arresting them, but if they don't arrest them get get sued for dereliction of duty .

but the court already decided cops do not have the "duty" to do anything

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u/[deleted] 28d ago

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u/Sapient6 28d ago

Take that money from the police pension fund. And if the police not involved in this shit don't like it then they can do something about the nasty fucking cops standing right next to them. Fuck the thin blue line.

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u/Dontfollahbackgirl 28d ago

THIS!! That $900K was our tax money. Police will stop defending their wrongdoers when settlement comes from their pocket.

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u/Sciencetor2 28d ago

IDK if it's the cynic in me, but I truly believe if we do this the cops will just make sure the victims don't live to sue.

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u/ErectTubesock 28d ago

They basically kidnapped and tortured a guy for seemingly no reason. Life in prison should be on the table.

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u/floralbutttrumpet 28d ago

I mean, there's a reason: His surname is Perez. You can infer why this happened.

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u/BitterFuture 28d ago

Showing who's boss and enjoying inflicting pain isn't no reason - it's terrible, psychopathic reasoning, but it's not no reason.

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u/somepeoplehateme 28d ago

For fun. They did it for fun.

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u/redshirt31605 28d ago

Slap on the wrist and the taxpayers are paying for it.

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u/TheFreebooter 28d ago

Strip them of all of their assets. Life imprisonment, no chance of parole, and the usual slavery thing the US prison system has going on.

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u/Kate-2025123 28d ago

Just fire them and remove pension and retirement so they have nothing 😈

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u/GingeritisMaximus 28d ago

15 years is not enough. They’re a danger to society, and society needs to be protected from these people.

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u/ednichol 28d ago

Don’t say one word to the police. Always let your lawyer do the talking. It doesn’t matter how innocent you are. NOT ONE WORD.

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u/Callaloo_Soup 28d ago

I think this is the most difficult part to understand and remember.

Anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law warranted or not.

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u/NickEcommerce 28d ago

Honestly, if I was told that my father was dead, and then they brought my dog into the room to "say goodbye" to me before being put to sleep, I'd really struggle to stick to "I want a lawyer".

In fact, I think I'd be pulling the drawstring from my shorts and hanging myself too.

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u/thealmightyzfactor 28d ago

That's why the only things you say are that you're invoking your right to remain silent and you want a lawyer. They're not supposed to interrogate you after that (though it's happened before) and if you say anything else it can be construed as you deciding to talk again, so assume anything said after "lawyer" is a trick to get you to not lawyer.

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u/Devout-Nihilist 28d ago

Think most people talk cause they think they can talk their way out. And if they lawyer up the interrogation ends and they get placed in jail until a lawyer can be there. I've come to believe that's why alot of people just stupidly ignore it and talk.

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u/thealmightyzfactor 28d ago

That and cop shows where only the bad guy assert their rights, making it seem wrong to not talk.

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u/foobazly 28d ago edited 28d ago

The time to ask for a lawyer is IMMEDIATELY at the beginning of an interrogation. The police in America cannot legally ask you any further questions at that point until your attorney is present.

If Perez had known to ask for an attorney as soon as he was mirandized, there would not have been any lies about his dead father. No 17 hour mental torture session. No withholding of medication. No lies about having his dog euthanized. NONE OF THAT WOULD HAVE HAPPENED.

As soon as you are taken into custody, DON'T SAY SHIT. If you are brought into an interview room and the cop starts reading your Miranda rights, IMMEDIATELY TELL THEM YOU WANT AN ATTORNEY. Then don't say another word until the attorney is there. Whether you're guilty or not.

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u/Cheshire_Jester 28d ago

And literally just that. The system isn’t looking to find the truth, it’s looking to find crimes and assign blame. To the point that it will literally create crimes out of whole cloth and start blaming the nearest person.

Nothing you say to the police in most situations is going to get you a step closer to freedom.

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u/ButtonholePhotophile 28d ago

That’s exactly what a guilty person would say. Cuff ‘em, Danno.

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u/Drop_Tables_Username 28d ago

It's important to note that whatever you say to the cops CANNOT be used to help you in court. It would be declared hearsay if a defense attorney tried using any of it.

So talking to the police cannot possibly benefit you.

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u/PeetaGryfyndoor 28d ago

huh, would you look at that! It is SHUT THE FUCK UP FRIDAY! https://youtu.be/6EI_RYIEtrg?feature=shared

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u/whoamIbooboo 28d ago

You beat me by 16 mins. Lol.

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u/tjean5377 28d ago

every time. It´s Memorial Day weekend folksies. Shut the fuck up!

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u/TheSigma3 28d ago

I feel like the American way of interrogation is disgusting. Watch a show like 24 hours in police custody in the UK and you'll see "no comment" interviews all the time, but Americans just get railroaded into answering questions and talking themselves into trouble somehow

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u/KeepTangoAndFoxtrot 28d ago

NOT ONE WORD

Actually, you should say exactly seven words.

"I want to speak to my lawyer."

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u/newsflashjackass 28d ago

Under no circumstances should you say "give me a lawyer, dog."

The court will deliberately and obtusely misunderstand you (in service of depriving you of due process) and there will be nothing you can do about it after the fact.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/true-crime/wp/2017/11/02/the-suspect-told-police-give-me-a-lawyer-dog-the-court-says-he-wasnt-asking-for-a-lawyer/

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u/jamie23990 28d ago

the Louisiana Supreme Court ruled that the suspect was, in fact, asking for a “lawyer dog,”

this is the dumbest thing i've read all day wow. didnt think it was possible to be worse than the US supreme court.

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u/[deleted] 28d ago

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u/b0w3n 28d ago

You also have to verbalize you're exercising your right to not speak without your lawyer. Cops fucked with someone in regards to this not too long ago because he never explicitly said he was exercising his rights.

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u/KeepTangoAndFoxtrot 28d ago

because he never explicitly said he was exercising his rights

It's dumb shit like that which leads SovCits to think there are "magic words" to get around all of the laws in America. The system is so damn broken.

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u/Peg-Lemac 28d ago

I have a son on the spectrum and have drilled into him since he was five: if the police want to ask you any questions, you’re not allowed to do it without a parent or lawyer there. He’s an adult now and every few months I’ll ask him what he’s supposed to do if he’s questioned. We need to teach this the way we teach “look both ways when crossing the street”.

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u/93wasagoodyear 28d ago

It's so fucking beyond sad this should even be a conversation

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u/Feisty_Efficiency778 28d ago

Yeah?

What about when they do this to your kid?

Cause there allowed to in most states.

And guess what?

Its easier and easier for them to do this the further south past the mason dixon line they get.

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u/Delcane 28d ago edited 28d ago

This is so fucked up that I would investigate retroactively other cases "solved" by these torturers. It seems like these guys just catch the first suspect they can find and make him "confess".

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u/coppersly7 28d ago

Let's be real, if they did what they should do and actually investigate every single case a corrupt cop is involved in it would cost thousands of man hours since just one cop can be involved in hundreds of cases and there's easily thousands of cops that have been proven corrupt, much less those that haven't been yet.

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u/Drakesyn 28d ago

I mean, at least they'd finally be solving some fucking crimes, right? Sounds like a good use of resources, which would be first for the majority of police departments.

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u/Moist_Choice64 28d ago

It was never about solving crimes guys... cmon now

I'll say it again.

It's gang gang all the way up.

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u/QQBearsHijacker 28d ago

End. Qualified. Immunity. Now

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u/Old_Society_7861 28d ago

Even if you’re reporting a potential crime you need an attorney. Good stuff.

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u/QQBearsHijacker 28d ago

The system is working as intended

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u/Me_Beben 28d ago

Good way to ensure crimes go unreported or unpunished. Sure, if something directly affects you like in this case you'll report it to the police because you have no other recourse.

But what if you witnessed an altercation between two people a day before one of them was murdered? What incentive do you have to speak up when you'll almost certainly be considered a suspect and potentially be put through hell for wanting to help an investigation?

I am constantly surprised at how bad cops can be at their jobs and still keep them.

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u/RobinsEggViolet 28d ago

It's because the cops jobs aren't actually to protect the public. Their job is to keep the public in line so the rich people can get away with exploiting everyone else. They know what their job is and they're actually very good at it.

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u/DependentThat9316 28d ago

I don't give a shit how many "good cops" there are, until qualified immunity is gone, ACAB.

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u/Zammy_Green 28d ago

What was the plan here? Why would they try to get a confession for a crime that didn't happen. Were they trying to pin another murder on him or were they just board. Even if the cops didn't know where the father was, without a body nothing would have happened. Is this shit just a games to those dipshit cops.

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u/Melodic_Mulberry 28d ago

They've seen too many cop shows where the lone detective's gut instinct was right all along and the uptight officer concerned for the rules was just holding him back. They make up their minds about who is guilty and then they secure evidence by any means necessary to vindicate themselves.

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u/spliffiam36 28d ago

"I got a feeling about this one, boss"

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u/Mr-Fleshcage 28d ago

Fucking copaganda

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u/RigasTelRuun 28d ago

Because they are sadistic monsters who like to torture people. They seen that an old man who wandered off. They see it as decent odds he might be confused and die. So they can now torture a vulnerable person, and when he gives a confession, they get a medal for locking up a murdered. The death penalty is too good for them.

The worst thing is you don't torture someone for hours like this as your first go at this. This is something they worked up to. Who knows how many innocent people they did this to.

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u/LittleALunatic 28d ago

I assume they didn't want to do any actual crime solving. Why would they? As much as we all pretend, its not their actual job description. Maybe one of them has the bright idea, even as a joke, haha maybe this guy did it? Then they're all in on it, viscious like wolves. They bring him in, torture him for fun. If the dad is dead, hey look we have a suspect and a confession. Crime Solvedtm. Police did their job of meeting their quotas. It doesn't matter if they do it successfully, or badly, if the number of cases closed goes up they get a pat on the back. If the dad is alive, ehh close enough. No consequences anyways.

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u/Nov3mber15 28d ago

Implausible things only seem implausible if you’re not capable of imagining yourself doing them. If you’re the type of person who would be comfortable killing another person for no reason, going from “My dad’s missing” to “Yeah, because you killed him” isn’t that big a leap.

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u/gladys-the-baker 28d ago

With no evidence, motive, witness, context, or reasonable suspicion - that's an absolutely massive fucking leap.

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u/Nov3mber15 28d ago

For a normal person, yes. For someone who sees threatening to murder a dog as a viable interrogation technique? It’s probably a half-step at the furthest.

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u/Valoneria 28d ago

"ah damn i stumbled, and would you look at that, murdered my father and his dog. Whoopsi-daisy, happens to us all amiright??"

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u/Nov3mber15 28d ago

It’s like the evil people version of when you tell that one well adjusted friend a story from your childhood and you’re laughing and she’s just sitting there horrified and you’re like “…what?”

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u/lil_zaku 28d ago

They did the same thing to a rape victim named Marie Adler. The Netflix series called "Unbelievable" is based on her story and it's nauseating. After forcing her to change her story, they then charged her for filing a false police report. Absolute filth.

I read in a university textbook once that you should always ask for a lawyer because it's your right and studies have found that people will confess to things they didn't do when talking to the police. It neglected to mention the mental torture and gaslighting done by the absolute pieces of shit police.

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u/RedditModsAreStr8 28d ago

American Nightmare is even more appalling - also on Netflix.

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u/shadowsOfMyPantomime 28d ago

The book "The Innocent Man" by John Grisham tells a similar story. It's astounding how common it is. A man was on death row for 11 years after a false confession before DNA exonerated him. Apparently there's also a series on Netflix for this one too

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u/TibetianMassive 28d ago

That case always makes me feel unease about the prospect of charging false accusers charges that carry the same time as rape. Morally it makes sense for them to receive the same sort of sentence, practically I'm worried it will be an excuse for certain police forces to torment victims of their friends and family, and then lock them up for a decade.

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u/DepartureDapper6524 28d ago

That whole “you will be appointed a lawyer if you cannot afford one” is not actually as fair or consistent as one might hope. In many areas, you have to be FAR below the poverty line to qualify for a public defender.

You might be destitute and in severe debt, but if you make over x amount per month, no luck. ~10 years ago when I ran into this, the number was $1200/month. They did not take bills or debt into consideration.

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u/redshirt31605 28d ago

I had a really expensive bicycle stolen at college years ago. The only thing the cop was interested in was trying to get me to buy one he had in his garage. Totally useless as usual.

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u/TomWithTime 28d ago

Maybe the cop stole it and was ready to sell it back to you

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u/Richard-Brecky 28d ago

That’s a lovely button on the end story. After realizing they fucked up, the police scoured the victim’s home to find something, anything to pin on him, but came up empty-handed.

I wonder who committed perjury to get a judge to sign off on this illegal search and what were the consequences for that crime?

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u/TotalNonsense0 28d ago

I wonder who committed perjury to get a judge to sign off on this illegal search

I'd place a small bet that no-one did. If they told the judge that he admitted to stabbing someone, and then attempted to hang himself, that is, strictly speaking, true.

Dishonest, but, strictly speaking, true.

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u/TheRealDoomsong 28d ago

Ok, it’s official time to start treating the cops like they tell themselves we treat them.

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u/Oxygenius_ 28d ago

This is a disgusting display of just how much power the wrong people can have.

And the lengths they will go to enforce that power on unsuspecting people

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u/Mtn_Grower_802 28d ago

Remember when the Miranda Rights are read, they say that everything you say WILL be used against you. Believe them! ALWAYS ASK FOR A LAWYER.

The police interrogation is to find a culprit, not find the actual perp, just to arrest SOMEONE, and close the case.

All of the true crime shows show the interrogation rooms when they bully the suspect. They always say that they're there to help them, they are not.

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u/[deleted] 28d ago

And don't forget that anything you say BEFORE being read the Miranda Rights can and WILL be used against you. You also ALWAYS have the right to remain silent, even before those rights are read. Never say anything to a police officer at any time except "I'm invoking my right to remain silent" or "I do not consent to any searches"

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u/WriteBrainedJR 28d ago

"Lawyer lawyer lawyer lawyer lawyer!'

-Simon Whistler, the casual criminalist

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u/JackDockz 28d ago

They literally threatened to kill his dog and lied about his father.No way they were going to get the guy a lawyer. They would've just tortured him more until they got their confession.

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u/disturbed_moose 28d ago

Yeah considering they behaved like they were moments away from waterboarding the poor man I doubt they would have cared about lawyers.

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u/TheHip41 28d ago

And this is why you never talk to the police. About anything

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u/Aggravating_Rate_286 28d ago

I’m ok with the death penalty for torture. The cherry on top is even after they were plainly wrong they still raided the house again desperately trying to find anything to attack this family with. At this point the rational response from the city would be to lock the station and burn it down, hard reset.

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u/[deleted] 28d ago

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/OrdertheThrow 28d ago

The mass of drooling bootlickers will take far more offense from this suggestion than they will at what these evil motherfuckers did to this poor man.

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u/FlamesNero 28d ago

What’s the difference between a cop and a criminal? A BADGE!

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u/Tenx82 28d ago

$900K isn't nearly enough compensation for this shit. Add two more zeroes, and arrest every single LEO that was involved.

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u/lecabs 28d ago

Call a fucking lawyer or even just ask to call one and all this bullshit evaporates in two seconds flat.

Don't voluntarily speak with the police without a lawyer present, you're gonna do 5-10

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u/PinAccomplished927 28d ago

Do not "ask" for a lawyer. They can easily misconstrue it in court as you "inquiring about the process." If you're being interrogated, you need to DEMAND a lawyer.

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u/diarrheaCup 28d ago

When the bootlickers inevitably come out to defend this shit I ask this: name one other profession where we train citizens how to interact with police like they are dealing with wild animals. Don’t make sudden moves, turn your lights on so they can see, don’t raise your voice, etc.

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u/al3442 28d ago

ACAB

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u/DaZMan44 28d ago

I hate this country

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u/Parasaurlophus 28d ago

Never talk to police without having a lawyer present to help you. It doesn’t matter if you have done nothing wrong or illegal; just keep repeating ‘I’m not saying anything until I can talk with a lawyer’. Demanding a lawyer is not a crime and the police absolutely arrest innocent people- they don’t have god-like powers to determine guilt. They will try to insist that your demands make you appear guilty, but the courts will never agree. Demanding a lawyer is what smart people do, not guilty people.

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u/Ok-Bar601 28d ago

What kind of sadistic people are these?

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u/leftistpropaganja 28d ago

The cops involved in this man's abuse and 'confession', should be sitting in a prison cell.

Until we start holding people accountable when they pull shit like this, it will keep happening.

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u/joeltb 28d ago

Cops suck! Something similar happened to me(although not as serious). My brother used to live with me in MY house and one day he called me and informed me that his gun was missing from the house. I head home and call the police to report it missing. They take the report and next thing I know they are coming over every day to harass/question us and next thing I know, I am the main suspect. LOLWTF? 1. Why would I steal my brothers gun? 2. If I stole it, why would I be so quick to report it to the police? I was young at the time and didn't know any better so I cooperated with them and went to the station for additional questions. They then tell me they are going to have a sheriff come in and give me a lie detector test which I was happy to oblige since I didn't steal it. I go to the station, they hook me and up and before they start I ask, "So as long as I tell the truth, I have nothing to worry about right? These things are accurate right?" The Sheriff assures me that I am correct so we proceed. I answer all the questions w/ honesty. We finish. He exits the room and makes me wait which I assume is to make me worry or something? An hour or so goes by and the sheriff enters the room and tells me that I should just confess to which I looked at him in confusion.. Why the fuck would I do that? That makes absolutely no sense. I hold my ground cuz I am innocent... they then tell me that I failed the polygraph. I saw my life flash right before my eyes. I was shocked, sick, and fell to the floor on my knees and kinda screamed, "But you told me all I had to do was tell the truth and that thing(polygraph) would work!" and they just walked away. My then wife came to the station to pick me up and when she noticed me all distraught and crying she asked the Sheriff why I was upset etc.. to which they said, "We don't know. He passed the polygraph...". So they fuckin' lied to me and said I failed when in reality I passed. They were just trying to get me to confess(which is their job).

Fuck all cops. Just sharing this story is making me vexed. ACAB!

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u/WeLiveInAir 28d ago

Fuck them for using a polygraph in the first place, they've been proven to not be accurate. I can even imagine myself failing a polygraph even though I'm innocent just because I'm terrified and nervous at being interrogated at all

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u/MadOvid 28d ago

Perez’s father wasn’t dead — or even missing. Thomas Sr. was at Los Angeles International Airport waiting for a flight to see his daughter in Northern California. But police didn’t immediately tell Perez.

So wait, they knew?

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u/[deleted] 28d ago

NEVER CALL THE COPS. They are not there to protect and serve.  They're the government goon squads that enforce the system will.

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u/SellaraAB 28d ago

I mean… sometimes you just have to call the cops. Imagine how it looks if the dad was dead and he never called the cops? Sometimes it’s just a defense against shit like this.

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u/AOEmishap 28d ago

Quality detective work, there. Merits an additional demand for 900k in the next police budget for 'quality control'. Good use of hard earned taxpayer money...

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u/VersaceSamurai 28d ago edited 28d ago

What the fuck? This happened in my city and I’m just hearing about it? Our police department is the fucking worst. They were deploying tear gas during the George Floyd protests and they routinely harass street vendors. This city’s government is extremely Republican and the mayor sucks up Trump and we have been sold down the river for warehouses that pollute our air. Fuck these losers

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u/atheistpianist 28d ago edited 28d ago

The police in Waco lied to me about when they had last conducted a welfare check on my dad, as someone besides me had already called to have them check on dad. They used my aunt’s legal name when describing who had called them, but in all my 30+ years at the time, I had never heard her go by her first name, so I was clueless as to who this unknown person was that had called for him. But the police assured me they had just been to check on him a couple of hours ago, and once the landlord had let them into his apartment, they found him asleep in bed with his hearing aids out.

The truth was it had been over 12 hours since they had last checked on him, and their lie about timing caused our family to wait yet another 24 hours before finally going there in person. I had covid at the time, and was really sick from it and didn’t want to risk the hour and half drive down to Waco while infected with covid. My aunt who had originally called finally drove four hours out to him the following day as still no one could reach him, and she found him barely alive, with the nearest hospital almost 30 minutes away. He had passed before my sister & I were nearly all the way to the hospital.

He had a stroke and heart attack, and ended up in his recliner in his living room for over 24 hours because the cops lied and didn’t want to go back. We were desperate for answers, and they chose to lie about the last check. This info came from both the sheriff’s office, and local PD. I will never forgive them or forget how their negligence allowed him to suffer when many of us were trying so hard to save him. I miss him very single day.

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u/bjb406 28d ago

Remember all that defund the police stuff? It was because of shit like this. Its because the police force as a whole is a rogue organization, with zero oversight, zero accountability, and doesn't even have core principles. So it is completely overrun with douche bags cosplaying either CSI, Walker Texas Ranger, or Sicario.

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u/FaeTyler 28d ago

Ok but why did the dad leave to walk the dog then abandon it to go home by itself and end up at the fucking airport without ever saying a word to his son

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u/vishy_swaz 28d ago

I’ve been at the point for years now where I will do just about anything to avoid calling the cops. There has not been a single situation I’ve been in where calling the cops made anything better.

A police officer is one of the more expensive people you can talk to in US society. If you have to deal with a cop, it’s gonna cost you in some way.

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