r/todayilearned 5h ago

TIL in 2017, Morgan Spurlock of “Super Size Me” admitted to a history of alcohol abuse, which is now thought to better account for his various health symptoms originally attributed to McDonald’s food.

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en.wikipedia.org
6.2k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 9h ago

TIL that the movie character Raymond from the Academy Award winning movie Rain man was based on real life savant, Kim Peek. He could simultaneously read the left side and right side pages of a book at the same time and had complete memory of over 12,000 books.

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en.wikipedia.org
14.0k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 12h ago

TIL that Rick James had a brief relationship with Linda Blair, the star of "The Exorcist." When she terminated a pregnancy without informing him, it deeply affected him inspiring him to record the song "Cold Blooded" about her

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en.wikipedia.org
10.4k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 7h ago

TIL that Aztecs had 18 festivities each year, 17 of which included human sacrifices. Apart from extraction of the heart, they used variety of other methods; drowning, starvation, decapitation, burning, bludgeoning, throwing from heights, forced gladiatorial combat and shooting with arrows.

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en.wikipedia.org
2.3k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 5h ago

TIL That Between 2012 and 2016, atleast 147 Visitors drowned in Hawai'i, nearly one a week on average, while doing common tourist activities like swimming and snorkeling....

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civilbeat.org
862 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 19h ago

TIL a 2022 survey of 3,000 adults & children found that just 27% of children (ages 6-16) said they regularly play outside their homes, whereas, 71% of the baby boomer generation said they did when they were children (80% for those ages 55-64).

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savethechildren.org.uk
10.8k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 18h ago

TIL Big Ben has a Prison Room. Last time it was used as a prison room was in 1880, when a newly elected atheist member of Parliament refused to swear an oath to the Queen.

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en.wikipedia.org
4.6k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 16h ago

TIL the Gestapo compiled a "Black Book" listing prominent residents of Great Britain to be rounded up after a successful invasion. In addition to obvious names like Churchill, the Nazis set their sights on Bertrand Russell and Virginia Woolf.

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en.wikipedia.org
3.3k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 20h ago

TIL homicide clearance rates in the US declined from a peak of 93% in 1962 to 64% in 1994. The rate then plateaued (with some variation) for the next 25 years. There is currently no satisfactory explanation for either the initial decline or why it ended when it did.

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7.1k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 22h ago

TIL that the Sam Kee Building, recognized by Guinness World Records as the world's narrowest commercial building, was built after its owner bet a business associate that he could make use of the 6 ft (1.5 m) wide strip of land he had left after the city took 79% of his land without compensating him.

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en.wikipedia.org
9.6k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 13h ago

TIL About USS The Sullivans - The first ship in the Navy named after more than one person. It was named after 5 brothers who were killed when their ship was torpedoed in WWII, an event that led to the policy portrayed in Saving Private Ryan. USS The Sullivans itself sunk in 2022 as a museum ship.

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1.4k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 18h ago

In USA TIL 'Michael' was the most frequently given male name every year between 1954-1998 except for 1960 (David) and it fell out of the top five in 2011 for the first time since 1949.

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en.wikipedia.org
3.4k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 13h ago

TIL that Rip, a stray dog adopted by an Air Raid Patrol in World War II, saved over 100 people despite having no training. He earned the Dickin Medal and inspired the training of search and rescue dogs.

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en.wikipedia.org
962 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 9h ago

TIL until the 1950s France served alcohol with children's school lunches

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snopes.com
539 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 14h ago

TIL that Microsoft skipped version 13 of Microsoft Office due to concerns about triskaidekaphobia (fear of the number 13).

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en.wikipedia.org
1.2k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 14h ago

TIL that 17 million telegrams are still sent every year. By comparison, over 200 billion e-mails are sent every day. They are most commonly sent to meet certain legal requirements or to express congratulations or condolences.

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youtube.com
973 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 12h ago

TIL that, although coral is usually associated with the tropics, there are colorful coral reefs in arctic waters around Canada, the Faroe Islands, Greenland and Iceland, as well as Ireland and the UK.

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mareano.no
430 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 13h ago

TIL there is a legend that Gibraltar will remain British as long as the local macaque monkey population exists. During WWII the population dwindled to only 7, and Churchill ordered their numbers to be replenished because of this belief

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en.wikipedia.org
420 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 13h ago

TIL that the first aircraft autopilot was developed in 1912. The autopilot connected a gyroscopic heading indicator and attitude indicator to hydraulically operated elevators and rudder. It permitted the aircraft to fly straight and level on a compass course without a pilot's attention

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en.wikipedia.org
378 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 1d ago

TIL that most people can see their own white blood cells moving through their retinas

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en.wikipedia.org
26.5k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 1d ago

TIL that Apple designs and tests its product boxes so that they open at just the right speed

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13.4k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 5h ago

TIL David Cronenberg's early horror film, The Brood, was his answer to the optimistic divorce drama Kramer vs. Kramer released the same year. He also intentionally cast the main couple in the film to resemble Cronenberg and his wife. He considered it his "most cathartically satisfying film."

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bfi.org.uk
67 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 2h ago

TIL that Kashmir has the world's only floating post office, located on Dal Lake in Srinagar. It was relaunched in August 2011 and also includes a museum within itself.

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siasat.com
32 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 23h ago

TIL Silphium is an unidentified/extinct plant - the exact identity is unclear, highly debated - that was used as a contraceptive and an abortifacient by ancient Greeks and Romans. The plant was also used as seasoning, medicine, perfume, aphrodisiac.

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en.wikipedia.org
1.3k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 10h ago

TIL that there was a cold war operation that gathered official documents from trash bins, because they were frequently used as tissue paper in the tissue-paper-less east germany

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en.wikipedia.org
119 Upvotes